Science Sparks Art

A collection of beautiful discovery.
Marcel Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase heralded the beginning of the Cubist movement when it was displayed at the 1913 Armory Show in New York City. One critic described it looking like a lumber yard after a tornado.
Cubism was an attempt to explore the Fourth Dimension aesthetically (and not coincidentally emerged around the same time as Einstein’s Theory of Relativity). In a wonderful essay over at The Smart Set, it’s explained: 
[Duchamp] wasn’t trying to produce a scientific theory about dimensions. He was playing with scientific ideas and terminology to produce Romantic feelings.

Marcel Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase heralded the beginning of the Cubist movement when it was displayed at the 1913 Armory Show in New York City. One critic described it looking like a lumber yard after a tornado.

Cubism was an attempt to explore the Fourth Dimension aesthetically (and not coincidentally emerged around the same time as Einstein’s Theory of Relativity). In a wonderful essay over at The Smart Set, it’s explained: 

[Duchamp] wasn’t trying to produce a scientific theory about dimensions. He was playing with scientific ideas and terminology to produce Romantic feelings.

jtotheizzoe:

I love this poem. May Swenson invokes both the form of a DNA helix with her stacked, bulged lines of text, AND pays homage to a Marcel Duchamp painting in both words and shape. Ain’t it great when art and science get all snuggly?

jtotheizzoe:

I love this poem. May Swenson invokes both the form of a DNA helix with her stacked, bulged lines of text, AND pays homage to a Marcel Duchamp painting in both words and shape. Ain’t it great when art and science get all snuggly?



Artist Sam Van Aken collects peach, apricot, plum, and almond species and grafts them together for his Tree of 40 Fruits project. The artist-horticulturist plants, prunes, and tends several of these intriguing living sculptures across the country. In the Springtime, the trees reveal a rainbow of pink blossoms. Throughout the June to October growing season, each tree bears a nice quantity and variety of local heirloom fruit.
The artist explained to Epicurious: 

In trying to find different varieties of stone fruit to create the Tree of 40 Fruit, I realized that for various reasons, including industrialization and the creation of enormous monocultures, we are losing diversity in food production and that heirloom, antique, and native varieties that were less commercially viable were disappearing. I saw this as an opportunity to, in some way, preserve these varieties. In addition to maintaining these varieties in my nursery, I graft them to the Tree of 40 Fruit. Additionally, when I place a Tree of 40 Fruit, I go to local farmers and growers to collect stone fruit varieties and graft them to the trees. In this way they become an archive of the agricultural history of where they are located as well as a means to preserve antique and native varieties.

 
artlistpro:

(via The Tree of 40 Fruit Is Exactly as Awesome as It Sounds | Epicurious.com) Artist Sam Van Aken discusses his thought-provoking project and its place at the intersection of farming, sculpture, and preservation by Lauren Salkeld

Artist Sam Van Aken collects peach, apricot, plum, and almond species and grafts them together for his Tree of 40 Fruits project. The artist-horticulturist plants, prunes, and tends several of these intriguing living sculptures across the country. In the Springtime, the trees reveal a rainbow of pink blossoms. Throughout the June to October growing season, each tree bears a nice quantity and variety of local heirloom fruit.

The artist explained to Epicurious: 

In trying to find different varieties of stone fruit to create the Tree of 40 Fruit, I realized that for various reasons, including industrialization and the creation of enormous monocultures, we are losing diversity in food production and that heirloom, antique, and native varieties that were less commercially viable were disappearing. I saw this as an opportunity to, in some way, preserve these varieties. In addition to maintaining these varieties in my nursery, I graft them to the Tree of 40 Fruit. Additionally, when I place a Tree of 40 Fruit, I go to local farmers and growers to collect stone fruit varieties and graft them to the trees. In this way they become an archive of the agricultural history of where they are located as well as a means to preserve antique and native varieties.

 

artlistpro:

(via The Tree of 40 Fruit Is Exactly as Awesome as It Sounds | Epicurious.com) Artist Sam Van Aken discusses his thought-provoking project and its place at the intersection of farming, sculpture, and preservation
by Lauren Salkeld

From Euro News: Scientists believe they have identified 14-billion year old signals left in the immediate aftermath of the Big Bang. Using a telescope at the South Pole, they found evidence of the colossal ripples that pervade today’s universe and which were formed at its very beginning.

“This detection is cosmology’s missing link, it’s something we thought should be there, but we weren’t really sure and it’s been eagerly sought now for close to two decades,” said theoretical physicist Marc Kamionkowski.
These ripples are imagined with great psychedelic energy by feminist artist Judith Bernstein, in her Birth of the Universe at Gavin Brown’s enterprise , up through April 19. 
From the gallery: Birth of the Universe is a new and visionary body of work by this New York–based artist. Her provocative art embodies the psychological amalgamation of sex, violence, and feminism in different orders and priorities. In this current series, fluorescent and rich oil paint exemplifies the chaos, violence, and nuclear explosion that was The Big Bang. She probes the origin of space, time, and infinity, using the rage of the active cunt as the primal source in the expanding universe.

From Euro News: Scientists believe they have identified 14-billion year old signals left in the immediate aftermath of the Big Bang. Using a telescope at the South Pole, they found evidence of the colossal ripples that pervade today’s universe and which were formed at its very beginning.

“This detection is cosmology’s missing link, it’s something we thought should be there, but we weren’t really sure and it’s been eagerly sought now for close to two decades,” said theoretical physicist Marc Kamionkowski.

These ripples are imagined with great psychedelic energy by feminist artist Judith Bernstein, in her Birth of the Universe at Gavin Brown’s enterprise , up through April 19. 

From the gallery: Birth of the Universe is a new and visionary body of work by this New York–based artist. Her provocative art embodies the psychological amalgamation of sex, violence, and feminism in different orders and priorities. In this current series, fluorescent and rich oil paint exemplifies the chaos, violence, and nuclear explosion that was The Big Bang. She probes the origin of space, time, and infinity, using the rage of the active cunt as the primal source in the expanding universe.

Photographer Karin Apollonia Müller is known for her stark Los Angeles cityscapes that examine alienation in the modern world. But, in her latest works, Worldlights and Citylights, Müller examines life at another level. Altering data provided by the Spitzer and Hubble telescopes, she has created fantastical traces of human habitation out of our nighttime light pollution. She has also created mind-blowingly gorgeous galaxies that exist only in pixels.

Cosmos

Welcome to the multiverse! Cosmos is back in a big way with host Neil deGrasse Tyson. 

(Source: ofalltime, via ihatepeacocks)

Mineral mining may be the the biggest form of acquisition in the world: US mineral exports are worth $6 billion annually and Americans use 40,000 lbs of new minerals a year. Cyprien Gaillard’s installation Today Diggers, Tomorrow Dickens , recently on view at Gladstone Gallery, perfectly illustrates the perilous balance between the destruction of mining and the invaluable materials that are acquired.

Gaillard’s installation was described as “ a series of excavator machine parts…Placed directly on the floor, with the teeth once used for digging now acting as a sculptural anchor, the excavator heads are set with deftly carved pieces of onyx…”

The onyx rods provided a beautiful contrast to the terrifyingly powerful machine pieces and, to me, highlighted the complexities and contradictions of today’s modern world.

shrubism:

Cyprien Gaillard
Today Diggers, Tomorrow Dickens

Gladstone Gallery
530 West 21st Street
November 9-Feb 1, 2014

Artist Eduardo Kac has made several interesting genetic works. He famously produced a trangenic, glow-in-the dark bunny in 2000 and last year created a hybrid petunia that produces his DNA in its petals.

He’s created something wholely different, in his piece, Aromapoetry. This piece is a poetry book, not of words, but of smells. Aroma molecules are embedded behind a “mesoporous nanolayer of glass” on the pages of a beautiful silver book. There are 12 different aromatic poems to be experienced, written one per page.

From his site, the artist explains, “Aromapoetry is a book to be read with the nose.” 

museumuesum:

Erik Olson

I Fucking Love Space, 2011
oil on panel, 48 x 36 inches

Mercury, 2011
oil on panel, 48 x 36 inches

Venus, 2011
oil on panel, 48 x 36 inches

Earth, 2011
oil on canvas, 72 x 84 inches

Mars, Fear & Dread, 2011
oil on panel, 48 x 36 inches

Jupiter, 2011
oil on panel, 48 x 36 inches

Saturn, 2011
oil on panel, 48 x 36 inches

Uranus, 2011
oil on panel, 48 x 36 inches

Neptune, 2011
oil on panel, 48 x 36 inches

The Gateway (Hubble Deep Field), 2011
oil on canvas, 72 x 84 inches

(via ihatepeacocks)